297 STANDING COMMITTEE A Thursday, 17th July, 1919

[Mr. W. NICHOLSON in the Chair.]

ALLIENS RESTRICTION BILL
EIGHTH DAY'S PROCEEDINGS. NEW CLAUSE.
—(Saving Clause for Persons Married to British-born Subjects.)

No alien who is married to a British-born subject shall be deported on the sole grounds of nationality.—[Lieut.-Commander Kenworthy.]

Brought up, and read the first time.

Lieut. - Commander KENWORTHY: I beg to move, "That the Clause be read a second time." The object of this proposal is self-evident. The Committee take the view, I am quite sure, that we do not want an influx of Germans into this country, and we do not want a large German population left here. This provision is intended to safeguard the case of a British-born woman who has married a German, who has been interned during the War, and who is now technically a German woman, although she is not a German woman before the eyes of her countrymen. Of course, her husband has been interned as a precaution, and she is now very anxious to know that her husband will not be sent back, and that she will not be cut off from all ties in this country. I do not think anyone wants to interfere with family relations, and we do not want to break up 298 homes. Of course, where a German comes under the other Orders he will be deported at once. If the alien has been dangerous during the War, or is undesirable now, or is a known spy, he will be deported. The object of this Clause is to see that if a German is married to a British-born woman he will not be forced to leave this country unless he wishes to do so.

The SECRETARY of STATE for the HOME DEPARTMENT (Mr. Shortt): I hope my hon. and gallant Friend will not press this Clause. So far as the Home Office is concerned, there will be regard shown to humanitarian considerations, and as far as possible all British-born women who are still British, except that they have married a foreigner, will not be unduly injured or subjected to undue hardship. I have consistently, and in my view rightly, fought as hard as possible for an unfettered hand in this matter. Where the restrictions were such as pressed upon the German I have opposed them, and equally I think I ought to oppose any restrictions which press in favour of the German. If you get a decent English woman who is married to an alien who has lived in this ocuntry, against whom nothing can be said except that he happens to be a German, it is very unlikely that any Home Secretary would deport a man of that kind, and certainly the present Home Secretary would not do so.

Lieut.-Commander KENWORTHY: I ask leave to withdraw my Motion.

Sir JOHN BUTCHER: I agree with the Home Secretary that this Clause should not be put in, and I should have objected 299 to it on its merits, because it suggests that where a German has entrapped some British woman to marry him he should be allowed to be exempted and not come under the general principle of Germans who should be sent out of the country. I think that is an extraordinary proposal. I have heard with regret that the Home Secretary is going to instruct the Advisory Committee in this sense, and I hope he will not allow the Committee to exempt Germans in this way.

Lieut.-Commander KENWORTHY: If the hon. and learned Member is not speaking against the Clause being withdrawn, I suggest that he is not in order in discussing it.

The CHAIRMAN: The hon. Baronet is quite entitled to speak on this subject. The question before the Committee is, "That the Clause be read a second time."

Sir J. BUTCHER: I only wish to enter a respectful protest. The general rule laid down by the Prime Minister and the Lord Chancellor was that all these Germans should be deported, and I protest most strongly that there should be an exemption made either by the Home Secretary or the Advisory Committee upon the broad general principle that simply because a German marries some unfortunate English woman he should be allowed to remain here.

Mr. SHORTT: That is very far from what I laid down.

Sir J. BUTCHER: I do not think that ought to be a consideration unless the man has remained here at least thirty-five years, or something like that period.

Motion and Clause, by leave, withdrawn.

The following three new Clauses stood upon the Paper in the name of Colonel Sir HENRY NORRIS:

NEW CLAUSE.
—(Membership of House of Commons.)

Persons of alien birth (unless they shall prior to the passing of this Act have been so elected) shall not be eligible to be elected Members of His Majesty's House of Commons.

NEW CLAUSE.
—(Membership of Local Authorities.)

Persons of alien birth (unless they shall prior to the passing of this Act have been so elected) shall not be eligible to be elected members of any county, borough, urban or rural district council, or board of guardians in the United Kingdom, or serve the office of mayor, or act as a justice of the peace.

300 NEW CLAUSE.
—(Appointment in Government Departments.)

Persons of alien birth (unless they shall prior to the passing of this Act have held such an appointment) shall not be eligible to hold any appointment in any of the Departments of His Majesty's Government in the United Kingdom without the written sanction of the Secretary of State for the Home Department, who shall report to Parliament the names of all persons of alien birth so appointed and the special reasons for such appointments.

The CHAIRMAN: The first two Clauses are out of order, but the hon. and gallant Gentleman may move the third Clause, if he wishes, in a slightly different form.

Sir H. NORRIS: I more or less anticipated, Mr. Nicholson, that you would raise that objection, but I want to ask whether it is not possible to extend the scope of the Bill in some way so that these provisions may be carried into effect?

The CHAIRMAN: It is not possible for this Committee to extend the Bill, because the principle of this measure has already been decided. We are now dealing with aliens, and not naturalised British subjects.

Sir H. NORRIS: Then you do not rule my third Clause out of order?

The CHAIRMAN: No; if it is confined to aliens.

NEW CLAUSE.
—(Appointments in Government Departments.)

No alien (unless they shall prior to the passing of this Act have he'd such an appointment) shall be eligible to hold any appointment in any of the Departments of His Majesty's Government in the United Kingdom without the written sanction of the Secretary of State for the Home Department, who shall report to Parliament the names of all persons of alien birth so appointed and the special reasons for such appointments.

Brought up, and read the first time.

Sir H. NORRIS: I beg to move, "That the Clause be read a second time." My Motion is one which, I think, must commend itself to the Committee, and the matter is not one upon which one need enlarge.

Mr. SHORTT: It seems to me that the Clause which the Committee might properly accept would be Sub-section (1) of the Clause standing in the name of the hon. and learned Member for York (Sir J. Butcher)— "(1) After the passing of this Act no alien shall be appointed in any office in the Civil 301 Service of the United Kingdom without the written sanction of the Secretary of State for the Home Department, who shall report to Parliament the names of all aliens so appointed, and the special reasons for such appointments."

Sir H. NORRIS: I am willing to substitute those words.

Mr. SHORTT: So far as the second Sub-section is concerned— "(2) No alien shall he permitted to sit for any examination conducted by the Civil Service Commissioners—" There would have to be permission by the Secretary of State to allow an alien to sit for an examination. Otherwise, there might be a person whom he desired to appoint to some position in the Civil Service, and for whom an examination might be desirable and he could not examine him. I am now talking about the next Clause on the Paper, and I am afraid that I am out of order. If I accept Sub-section (1) of the Clause standing in the name of the hon. and learned Member for York I should have to have the same right to give permission in the case of Sub-section (2) of the same Clause; otherwise, you might have an appointment for the Civil Service under Sub-section (1) where an examination was necessary, and you would be prohibited from holding it.

Mr. STEWART: I am much obliged to the Home Secretary for his suggestion. As far as I am concerned, I would be willing to accept the second paragraph he has drafted.

The CHAIRMAN: Does the hon. Member for Fulham (Sir H. Norris) press his new Clause?

Sir H. NORRIS: I am prepared to adopt the view of the Home Secretary, and I ask leave to withdraw my Clause.

Motion and Clause, by leave, withdrawn.

NEW CLAUSE.
—(Appointment of Aliens to the Civil Service.)

(1) After the passing of this Act no alien shall be appointed in any office in the Civil Service of the United Kingdom without the written sanction of the Secretary of State for the Home Department, who shall report to Parliament the names of all aliens so appointed, and the special reasons for such appointments.

(2) No alien shall be permitted to sit for any examination conducted by the Civil Service Commissioners.—[Mr. Stewart.]

Brought up, and read the first time.

302

Mr. STEWART: On behalf of my hon. and learned Friend (Sir J. Butcher) I beg to move, "That the Clause be read a second time"

Mr. SHORTT: Are we now considering only Sub-section (1)? If so, I hope the Committee will accept it?

Mr. REID: May I ask whether an alien is now eligible to sit for a Civil Service examination?

Mr. SHORTT: No.

Question put, and agreed to.

Clause read a second time.

Mr. SHORTT: I beg to move in Subsection (2), after the word "permitted," to insert the words "without the written sanction of the Secretary of State for the Home Department."

Mr. HOPKINSON: Is there any real benefit to be gained by putting in Subsection (2)? It seems to me that Sub-section (1) provides fully for everything provided for by Sub-section (2). There is no real harm in an alien sitting for an examination where there is not the least possibility of his ever holding the appointment for which he is sitting.

Mr. SHORTT: There might be some very good reason why a particular alien, if he did in fact possess the qualifications which he was supposed to have, would be very valuable indeed if appointed for a short time or for a special purpose, and you could not, unless those words were in, examine him to see if he had those accomplishments.

Mr. HOPKINSON: I may be very stupid, but it seems to me that if you omit Subsection (2) altogether he could still sit for an examination.

Mr. SHORTT: I have accepted Subsection (2) in principle.

Mr. HOPKINSON: It does not matter very much.

Amendment agreed to.

Clause, as amended, added to the Bill.

NEW CLAUSE.
—(Restriction on Change of Name by Aliens.)

(1) An alien shall not for any purpose assume or use or purport to assume or use or continue after the commencement of this Act the assumption or use of any name other than that by which he was ordinarily known on the fourth day of August, nineteen hundred and fourteen. 303

  • Where any such person as aforesaid carries on or purports or continues to carry on, or is a member of a partnership or firm which carries on, or which purports or continues to carry on any trade or business in any name other than that under which the trade or business was carried on on the fourth of August nineteen hundred and fourteen, he shall for the purpose of this Section be deemed to be using or purporting or continuing to use a name other than that by which he was ordinarily known on the said date.
  • A Secretary of State may, if it appears desirable in any particular case, grant an exemption from the provisions of this Section.
  • Nothing in this Section shall—
  • affect the assumption or use or continued assumption or use of any name in pursuance of the royal licence; or
  • affect the continuance of the use by any person of a name which he has assumed before the commencement of this Act if he has been granted an exemption under the Defence of the Realm Act or the Aliens Restriction Order; or
  • prevent the assumption or use by a married woman of her husband's name.—[Mr. Shortt.]
  • Clause brought up, and read the first time.

    Mr. SHORTT: I beg to move "That the Clause be read a second time." A pledge was given by my hon. and gallant Friend (Colonel Sir Hamar Greenwood) that such a Clause should be brought in in accordance with Regulation 14 H of the Defence of the Realm Regulations, and I think that it does, in fact, fulfil that pledge.

    Sir COURTENAY WARNER: Could not the right hon. Gentleman also put before the Treasury that there is some money to be got from people who are changing their name, and that some fee could be charged, subject to the terms of the licence?

    Mr. SHORTT: That is the subject of an Amendment.

    Question put, and agreed to.

    Clause read a second time.

    Mr. STEWART: I beg to move in Subsection (3), after the word "desirable," to insert the words "on special grounds."

    Mr. SHORTT: I will accept that Amendment.

    Amendment agreed to.

    Mr. STEWART: I beg to move, at the end of the Clause, to add the following new Sub-section: 304 "(5) The Secretary of State when he grants an exemption under this Section shall not permit an alien to assume any name at haphazard, but shall ensure, as far as possible, that the new name is the equivalent in English of the alien's former name." I would urge the Home Secretary to accept the principle of this Amendment. The privilege which we gave in old days to aliens of taking any name they liked without any fee was an altogether unreasonable privilege. A man may want to change his name for various reasons—to hide his identity and pose as an Englishman. He never changes his name for our benefit, but always for his own. A trader will do it to delude his customers into thinking that they are dealing with English people. It is very hard for a Briton to wake up some morning and find that his most disagreeable neighbour two doors off has changed his name to that of the Briton and is now entering into competition with him in his own business. Members of the last Parliament will remember that the Member for the Mansfield Division (Sir Arthur Markham) had his name taken by a most objectionable person, an ex-alien, who carried on a coal business in the City of London under the name of Arthur Markham and Company, and Sir Arthur was unable to protect himself in any way. A case came before me when sitting on a committee in this House of a German named Goldberg who had been posing as Mr. Grosvenor for forty years in this country. He spoke English perfectly, and had served in The Honorable Artillery Company, and he held a passport granted to him in 1886 calling him "Mr. Grosvenor." He had evidently written to the Foreign Office and they had said themselves, "He is one of the Grosvenor family, we must send him a passport." They were very easy-going in those days. There might be some reason for allowing these people to change their name if the English name were a translation of the foreign name. For instance, if the name Schwarzkopf were translated into Blackhead there might be some reasonable excuse, or if Schloss were translated into Castle or Newcastle the Home Secretary might permit it. The law lands us in an extraordinary position. I know a certain big market place. There was an assembly of members of that body, who considered that they were adding to their respectability by assuming the names of a certain nationality in these islands. They dealt in very small margins, and they used to 305 fight among each other so much that they were nicknamed the 64th Highlanders. That should not be capable of repetition. Supposing 500 aliens come up during the next fortnight and ask to be called "Lloyd George," what is the Home Secretary going to do?

    Mr. SHORTT: Allow it at once.

    Mr. STEWART: He will certainly protect the Prime Minister, and all I ask for in this Amendment is that the ordinary citizen should have the same protection A way of doing that appears to be this: We have all heard a great deal about the censorship during the War. and we are all looking for its abolition. But it might be retained in the Home Office, and some responsible officer might be given a censorship over these names, and he might manufacture them if he thinks fit, or ration them so that they will not get too many of one particular name. I suggested the other day that it would not hurt anybody if they were all called "Plantagenetss" There are not any "Plantagenets" living now. It is not usual to give reasons in a Statute, and, if it is more in accordance with order, I am willing to leave out the words "With a view to preventing the wholesale appropriation of British family names without any consideration for or consultation with the families affected," which are included in the Amendment as it appears upon the Order Paper and to make the Sub-section begin with the words "The Secretary of State."

    The CHAIRMAN: Then I will put the Sub-section, leaving out the words "With a view to preventing the wholesale appropriation of British family names without any consideration for or consultation with the families affected." Proposed words, as amended, there inserted.

    Mr. STEWART: I beg to move, after the words last inserted to add the following new Sub-section: "(6) A fee of two guineas shall be paid by any alien on obtaining a licence to change his name." The changing of names gives trouble to everybody—to the officials of the Home Office, to people printing directories, to telephone people and so on, and I think that there ought to be some payment. I am not quite sure that two guineas is enough. I rather think it might be a fee of not less than two guineas. That would 306 give the Home Office an opportunity of: making the person changing his name pay. up according to his ability to pay.

    Mr. SHORTT: I would suggest that it. would be better if it commenced in this way "such fee as the Secretary of State may determine, not being less than," and I would ask my hon. Friend not to press two guineas. There is a large number of really meritorious cases, old men and women, who are having a bad time of it, who really could not afford to pay two guineas. If you leave it to the discretion of the Secretary of State he can impose a fee of two guineas or ten or twenty guineas or 200 guineas, wherever the case will bear it, but two guineas is far too big a minimum. I think that 10s. will be ample as a minimum, and I hope that my hon. Friend will not press what, might very well work a hardship.

    Mr. STEWART: I am quite prepared to leave it to the discretion of the Home Office, but we ought to see that we do not make it too easy for these people to change their name. I do not see why a man should not live with the name his father gave him. I am much obliged to the Home Secretary for meeting me, and if he lets off some people with 10s. I hope that he will charge some others a great deal more.

    Sir WILLIAM PEARCE: Will the Home Secretary be able in practice to use such a discretion? Will he not get into endless trouble if he charges one man 10s. and another man £10? I think it will be found! in administration that it will be a flat rate, and therefore I am inclined to think that two guineas is a good sum to put in.

    Mr. HOPKINSON: If the Amendment is accepted I think it will enable the Home Secretary to tap a new source of revenue. He may make a schedule of names, desirable and otherwise, and vary his fees for them accordingly. Names like mine would be about 10s., but a name like his own would, for instance, be ten guineas ordinarily and another ten guineas for the extra "t" at the end of it!

    Sir C. WARNER: I think the Secretary of State ought to have a certain amount of power to let people off, but I do not think this Amendment does it in the right way. I think we ought to have a fixed rate of at least ten guineas, with power to the Secretary of State to remit the whole or any part of that payment.

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    Mr. SHORTT: I should be prepared to agree to that.

    Mr. HAYDAY: I hope we shall not do that. I have in mind families who have been resident here for forty years, who have had sons fighting for the British Army, and who have never had the same facilities, being working class families, for putting themselves in order as richer people have had, but who have run a good deal of adverse criticism to which they were not entitled during the War on account of their names. I would like to give them an opportunity to put themselves right without too heavy a payment. If a figure is once put in, that will be looked upon as a flat rate, and many of these people who are perhaps most entitled of all to have facilities granted them to change their names will not understand the methods that they should adopt to get any rebate from the amount that may appear in any Act of Parliament eventually. I think we ought to leave it purely to the discretion of the Home Office.

    Sir C. WARNER: I think if you put in a flat rate of ten guineas and give the Home Secretary absolute power to remit part or whole of it you will exactly meet the objections raised by the hon. Member. It would be very hard on some poor people even to pay a guinea, and under the Amendment which I suggest they would have to pay nothing, because they would apply for the remission, and they would be remitted the whole, certainly, in the case of men who had served in the Army; on the other hand, if you do not state a figure you get the rich men who are doing it for nefarious purposes paying nothing for it. I want to avoid that.

    Mr. STEWART: I think there is a good deal in what was said by the hon. Gentleman opposite (Mr. Hayday). There may be people who have lived here a long time who are good enough people and whom ten guineas would frighten; but there are people who would pay a thousand pounds to change their names—moneylenders, and people of that sort, who are out to make money, and I therefore think my own Amendment is perhaps the better way.

    Mr. SHORTT: If you are going to give power to remit I think it is better to fix the fee higher than two guineas. If there is going to be any doubt about it becoming a flat rate it would be far better to have it ten guineas, with power to remit, than 308 only two guineas with power to remit. I suggest that the Amendment should read "A fee of not less than ten guineas shall be paid by any alien on obtaining an exemption under this Section, but the Secretary of State may remit the whole or any part of such fee in special cases."

    Mr. HAYDAY: Should not the words "not less than" come out?

    Mr. SHORTT: No; because they involve the power to charge more in the case of a rich moneylender.

    Mr. STEWART: I will ask leave to withdraw my Amendment.

    Amendment, by leave, withdrawn.

    Amendment made: After the words last inserted add the following new Subsection: "(6) A fee of not less than ten guineas shall be paid by any alien on obtaining an exemption under this Section, but the Secretary of State may remit the whole or any part of such fee in special cases."—[Mr. Shortt.]

    Mr. STEWART: I beg to move, after the words last inserted, to add the following new Sub-section: "(7) A list of the persons to whom the Secretary of State has granted an exemption under this Section shall be published in the "Gazette" as soon as may be after the granting of the exemption." In the Amendment, as appearing on the Paper in the name of my hon. and learned Friend (Sir J. Butcher) the words "together with a statement of the special grounds on which it is granted" are included, but I have omitted them, as I understand that is the desire of the Home Secretary.

    Mr. SHORTT: I hope the Committee will accept the Sub-section, with the omission of the words mentioned by the hon. Member.

    Amendment agreed to.

    Mr. STEWART: I beg to move, after the words last inserted, to add the following new Sub-section: "(8) Any person to whom any such exemption is granted shall within one calendar month thereafter publish at his own expense, in some paper circulating in the district in which he resides, an advertisement stating the fact that the exemption has been granted."

    Sir C. WARNER: I hope this Amendment will not be agreed to, because it is really a tax upon the poor people. It would be a very heavy tax for a man who has served in the Army and who wanted to change his name. He might be serving 309 as boots at an inn, and he might have a foreign name that he wanted to get rid of, and it would not be fair to make him advertise in the local newspaper and pay a guinea for it or whatever the fee might be.

    Sir W. PEARCE: I do not think there is any object in putting this into an Act of Parliament, and we do not want to put in any unnecessary words. If one stipulated that before the man was allowed to change his name he should give notice in the paper there would be something in it, but to provide that he should give notice after he has been allowed to change his name is unnecessary, because he will be only too anxious to do that on his own account in all probability.

    Sir H. NORRIS: I do not see the objection. Any ordinary person who changes his name by deed-poll has to advertise it at his own expense in the local newspaper, and I do not see why an alien should not be put to the same trouble.

    Mr. HAYDAY: I think this Section might well be withdrawn. I can see the difficulties and the injustices that are likely to arise if it is put in. The names will be published in the "Gazette," and after all is said: and done it is not the persons I am thinking of that we want unduly to pillory, but those who because they are well placed are probably a greater danger to the State. The underlying purpose, I think, is to prevent the possibility of aliens who are likely to prove dangerous, who may have been suspect during the War, from finding an easy avenue of making themselves right with the public sentiment in the country. I know of many instances, as every hon. Member here must know, of men who have actually served in the Army or who have three or four brothers who have served with the British Army, who still bear German names, but who are so disgusted with their own forebears from the national point of view that they would desire to be known by the English equivalent to those German names. Why you should expect that these men, after having secured a change of their name in the proper manner, should be required to advertise the fact in the local paper I do not know. Very likely it would only create suspicion in the minds of the people who might read the advertisement, and who might begin to attribute to them some- 310 thing that they have not been guilty of. I therefore think the Amendment is quite unnecessary.

    Mr. SHORTT: The real object of this Amendment, as I understand it, is the protection of a large body of people who probably never read the "Gazette" at all. It is intended for protection but, as it stands, it might work serious hardship on some people, as my hon. Friend suggests. I would suggest that the Amendment should be altered so as to read: "Any person to whom any such exemption is granted shall, if the Secretary of State so requires, within one calendar month thereafter publish at his own expense." Then, in such cases as my hon. Friend mentioned, it would not be required.

    Sir J. BUTCHER: Would it not be better, if we are to have the Secretary of State intervene at all, to put it the other way, so that every person shall advertise, unless the Secretary of State tells him he need not. Personally, I should like everyone to advertise. After all, the expense is very trifling. An advertisement of this sort would cost about 5s., and I think, if an alien is granted the privilege of changing his name, he ought to be able to pay a small sum for it.

    Mr. HAYDAY: After fighting in the Army or Navy?

    Sir J. BUTCHER: Well, if you make an exemption in favour of the fighting man, I am entirely with you, but I am talking about the average alien, who has not been fighting, and, in fact, the average alien or any other alien could not be accepted in the Army or Navy to fight, so that really that case does not arise.

    Mr. SHORTT: An alien whose son has been fighting.

    Mr. HAYDAY: Take as an example a man who has been a resident here for forty years, and has reared a family. They bear his name, and they might desire to change that name, but they have served under that name in the British Army or Navy.

    Sir J. BUTCHER: In a case of that sort, where a man has been forty years without changing his name, and thinks it is so important, for business and other purposes, that his name should be changed, I really think that man ought not to object to pay 5s. for an advertisement. There is a very strong feeling in the country 311 that when a man changes his name he should let it be known. I am continually getting letters asking me, "Who is this Jones? There is a man called Schmidt, or Wolfenstein, or something, who, we believe, has changed his name, to Jones, but we have not seen an authoritative statement." I really think, if it is worth while, for business or other purposes, for a man to change his name, it ought to be well worth while paying 5s. That is the only onus thrown upon him, and I do hope the Committee will say that he shall pay 5s. for this privilege. Many of us think that a change of name for business or other purposes ought to be carefully guarded. A man is granted this privilege, and surely it is worth his while to pay 5s. That is the only sacrifice, if I may so call it, that he is called upon to make for this privilege.

    Mr. SHORTT: Then do I understand my hon. and learned Friend does not accept the words "if the Secretary of State so requires."?

    Sir J. BUTCHER: I would much prefer not to do so.

    Mr. SHORTT: I do not like the Clause without it.

    Sir J. BUTCHER: In nine cases out of ten, or perhaps in ninety-nine cases out of 100, the Secretary of State might let it go without comment, and in that case, unless the Secretary of State intervened and said, "You must advertise," the man would be exempt from advertising. Surely it is much more reasonable not to trouble the Secretary of State in the matter at all. It would be very invidious for him to intervene, and no doubt he would have to show reasons for intervening. Surely it is better to have one law for all men in regard to change of names. The Home Secretary has enough to do with aliens without this. I really think my right hon. Friend, if he thinks it over, will desire not to throw this additional burden on himself and make it necessary in every case to ask himself "Now, must I require this man to advertise?"

    Mr. HOPKINSON: I hope the Committee will look at this from a commonsense point of view. The words proposed by the Home Secretary appeal to the commonsense of nine-tenths of the Committee.

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    The CHAIRMAN: Does the hon. and learned Member accept the proposal of the Secretary of State?

    Sir J. BUTCHER: I am afraid I cannot, as a matter of principle. If the Home Secretary feels very strongly about it, surely he can introduce words to meet the case on Report. For instance, he could introduce words less objectionable, so that the man shall advertise unless exempted by the Secretary of State.

    Mr. SHORTT: I am in the hands of the Committee.

    The CHAIRMAN: Will the Home Secretary move his proposed Amendment?

    Mr. SHORTT: No, I should not do that. I do not attach sufficient importance to the Sub-section. I only want it, if it is inserted, to be good. I am entirely in the hands of the Committee.

    Sir C. WARNER: I beg to move, in the proposed Amendment, after the word "shall," to insert the words "If the Secretary of State so require." I think the simplest way is that a member of the Committee should move the Amendment as proposed by the Home Secretary, and I therefore move it.

    Sir J. BUTCHER: I could not accept that for the reasons I have already given. If my hon. Friend had moved it in the form I suggested it would make it compulsory for the man to advertise unless the Home Secretary exempted him. I would have accepted that and thought it a fair compromise. I should prefer the Sub-section as it stands, but I will accept such a compromise in order to get through the Bill. We cannot have a Division, I am afraid, if we are not agreed because we are not a quorum.

    Sir C. WARNER: I only want to make peace, but I do not see that it helps in any way to give way to one Member who does not agree to this.

    Question put, "That those words be there inserted."

    The CHAIRMAN: The "Ayes" have it.

    HON. MEMBERS: The "Noes" have it.

    Sir W. PEARCE: May I submit to the hon. and learned Gentleman (Sir J. Butcher) that it is open to him to move to alter this on Report. I do not think it should be necessary to carry over the 313 proceedings on such a small point. If it is of sufficient importance, it can be raised in the House.

    Sir J. BUTCHER: I do not like to appear unreasonable. Whether I am or not is another question. I thought the suggestion I made would have met the view of the Home Secretary and the majority of the Committee, but if I am appealed to, I do not want to make the Committee sit again on what, I agree, is a small point. Therefore I will accept the Amendment of my hon. Friend, 314 "That the words proposed be there inserted."

    Question put, and agreed to.

    Proposed words, as amended, there inserted.

    Clause, as amended, added to the Bill.

    Title ("A Bill to continue and extend the Provisions of the Aliens Restriction Act," 1914") agreed to.

    Bill, as amended, ordered to be reported.

    Committee rose at Twenty-five minutes after Twelve o'clock.

    THE FOLLOWING MEMBERS ATTENDED THE COMMITTEE—

    Nicholson, Mr. William (Chairman)

    Baird, Major

    Bottomley, Mr.

    Butcher, Sir John

    Cecil, Lord Hugh

    Coates, Major Sir Edward

    Foxcroft, Captain

    Greene, Lieut.-Colonel Raymond

    Hayday, Mr.

    Hinds, Mr.

    Hopkinson, Mr. Austin

    Kenworthy, Lieut.-Commander

    Kinloch-Cooke, Sir Clement

    Lowther, Major Christopher

    Norris, Colonel Sir Henry

    Pearce, Sir William

    Reid, Mr.

    Rogers, Sir Hallewell

    Stewart, Mr.

    Shortt, Mr.

    Sugden, Mr.

    Taylor, Mr. John

    Warner, Sir Courtenay

    Watson, Captain

    Wilson, Mr. Tyson